New Fairlight HDMI Monitor Interface

Blackmagic Design now lets customers use any HDMI or SDI television or computer monitor with the large Fairlight Studio Consoles.

The Fairlight HDMI Monitor Interface lets customers use their own HDMI monitor with Fairlight 2, 3, 4, or 5 bay studio consoles for direct visual feedback. It works by converting the console’s ethernet data into HDMI and SDI, making it compatible with virtually any computer display or broadcast monitor. Just like the Fairlight Console LCD Monitor, users will be able to see channel strip information, levels, equalization, dynamics processing, plug-in interfaces and more.

Customers can also display the video program output from the timeline. The interface input can be switched to SDI so customers can see the talent up close for checking lip sync while mixing. The compact design is small enough to fit behind desks or monitors tucked away out of sight.

Blackmagic says Fairlight’s modular components can be dropped into a desk, making it easy to upgrade existing suites and furniture with Fairlight hardware. Each component comes with a mechanical drawing and cut out pattern that can be used as a guide, making it easy to modify their furniture to accommodate Fairlight hardware. Brackets and frames are also available for securely mounting the modules in place, ensuring a perfect, professional fit. The optional Fairlight HDMI Monitor Interface lets customers connect their own display, providing similar functionality as the Fairlight Console LCD Monitor.

You might also like...

Core Insights - TDM Mesh Networks - A Simple Alternative To Leaf-Spine ST2110

IP is delivering unprecedented flexibility and scalability for broadcasters. But there is a price to pay for these benefits, namely, the complexity of the system increases significantly as we add more video and audio over IP.

The Liberation Of Broadcast Technology - Part 2

Building optimized systems that scale to meet peak demand delivers broadcast facilities that are orders of magnitude more efficient than their static predecessors. In part 2 of this series, we investigate how this can be achieved.

HDR: Part 29 - Promoting The Three-Dimensional Illusion

When composing and lighting scenes, DOP’s usually seek to maximize texture and perspective. The rationale is simple: We live in a world that is unmistakably three-dimensional, so DOPs seeking to faithfully represent the natural world exploit a range of w…

NBCU Decentralizes Resources To Produce And Distribute Olympic Games Live

Aside from being the first Summer Olympics to be delayed a year due to a pandemic—shifting technical plans and causing strict work-arounds to comply with health restrictions—this year’s live coverage by NBCUniversal (NBCU) is noteworthy for its move …

The Liberation Of Broadcast Technology - Part 1

For many years broadcasters have been working with static systems that are difficult to change and upgrade. This two part series explores the unfolding of a more elastic future based on COTS hardware and flexible licensing.