​Brightline Presenter Lighting Kit Offers Wireless Control

The Presenter Lighting Kit uses PoE (Power over Ethernet) and wireless control to deliver simple and affordable lighting packages for single presenters.

Available for corner or straight installations, the new kits feature Brightline’s Flex-T recessed lighting LED panels for drop ceilings and drywall.

Designed around a familiar three-point lighting design, the Presenter Lighting Kit uses two single module and one double module Flex-T units for key, fill, and back lights. The design of Brightline’s T-Series is said to allow the lighting carriage to rotate for a higher level of control, and spot optics avoid lighting spill on nearby screens or video monitors.

“Ambient lighting is generally not good enough for presenters to be seen clearly, especially with today’s growing emphasis on videoconferencing for remote employees or students. Broadcasters are also looking for clean, affordable lighting solutions for smaller spaces that are dedicated to streaming content,” explained Kathy Katz, Brightline managing partner. “Our new Presenter Lighting Kit delivers a plug-and-play, personal three-pointing lighting system that is easy to install and control. Proper lighting ensures PowerPoint presentations or graphics on nearby screens don’t wash out the speaker, and protects presentations from being washed out by presenter lighting.”

Available in a rack mountable 2 RU chassis or standalone enclosure, the PoE control unit allows for IP control and reduces the cost of installation. Two internal drivers support the four Flex-T modules, while two LINC (Local Intelligence Node Controller) units allow each light to be controlled individually.

In addition to a wireless controller, the Kit includes the compact COR-TAP (Centralized Operational Resource – Technology Access Point) Wi-Fi hotspot. Accessible through any web browser, it allows access to system configuration and usage web pages, while serving as a technology firewall that isolates the user experience. 

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