Mo-Sys Introduce G30 - A New Generation Of Gyro-stabilized Remote Head

Its radical new design, with a compact, 45-degree frame, allows it to support virtually any broadcast or digital cinematography camera rig for precise movement and stabilization.

“In our conversations with the production community, we know that there is a real need for excellent stabilization and precision camera positioning without the expense and limitations of device-specific and proprietary mounts,” said Michael Geissler, CEO of Mo-Sys. “Whether it is on a vehicle, a remote mount or a crane, producers and directors want to be unrestricted creatively, with a device that is quick to set up and balance, and will accept whatever camera and accessories they need.”

The G30’s 45˚ frame geometry provides easy access to all the camera connections and accessories, making it simple to install any type of camera quickly and securely. The short, stiff frame provides rigidity for rigs of up to 30kg, and high torque direct drive motors deliver crisp, precise camera movement alongside excellent stabilization. Open hubs for the three drive motors means cable routing is clear and tidy and avoids the need for sliprings and camera-specific cables.

The unique frame design eliminates a serious limitation with some existing gyro head designs: the issue of gimbal lock, where pan axis movement – including stabilization – are impossible when the camera is pointing directly down. The G30 has impressive pan and tilt movement ranges, along with ±45˚ roll, suitable for most creative productions. Axis encoders are built into each motor assembly for direct input into virtual production systems.

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