Marshall Electronics And BR Remote To Create Unique PT Head

Marshall Electronics has joined forces with high-end pan/tilt head designer BR Remote, to design and build a micro P/T head for Marshall miniature cameras with the claimed unique ability to be mounted inverted.

The new P/T head is compatible with all Marshall 500 series cameras including the CV503, CV503-WP, CV506, CV506-H12, CV565 and CV566.

BR Remote makes very high-tech remote heads for film and television, and this collaboration leverages the strengths of both companies to create a really unique miniature camera pan/tilt head solution,” says Tod Musgrave, Director of Cameras at Marshall Electronics. “The team at BR Remote were very easy to work with and we are really impressed with the finished product and how it interacts with our miniature cameras.”

“The CV-PT-HEAD camera system can fit in the palm of your hand, and when used with the CV-MICRO-JYSTK passes power and control to the camera using the Lemo to Hirose cable included in box. We are highly motivated to continue to add more and more camera models in different configurations as well as forge relationships with highly skilled designers that can enhance the Marshall camera value proposition.”

The CV-PT-HEAD body is less than 3.5-inches tall and less than 2-inches wide creating one of the smallest P/T footprints available. It comes with an IP65 weatherproof rating, which means it is dust-tight and protected against water under pressure from any angle. When paired with Marshall’s weatherproof CV503-WP camera, the head creates a movable camera position that can be left out in wet and dirty environments. There’s a built-in camera power supply delivering a constant 12V to the camera socket as well as camera control data. The input voltage is from 12V to 35V allowing operators to run up to 3,000 feet with a common 4-pin XLR cable. Claimed unique for a small head, the input socket for power and control data is on the fixed base. This allows for better freedom of movement, with the camera socket on the moving part with the camera.

“As cameras are becoming smaller, it became evident that we needed a smaller head,” says David Bradley, Development Director, BR Remote. “One of the nice things about working with Marshall is that we were able to create a product that fits both of our customers’ needs. We are still using our bespoke engineering and the same ingenuity designed into our larger P/T heads, just in a smaller version. The main benefits of using Marshall is its high-quality image and design, and its low light capabilities. This new solution controls all parameters without the need for a secondary controller and runs on IP or fiber so it can be integrated into most existing infrastructures.”

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