GB Labs Upgrades Storage Operating Systems

UK based intelligent storage technology vendor GB Labs has upgraded its proprietary CORE.4 and CORE.4 Lite operating systems with improved security monitoring and analytics features.

These embrace both historical and real-time auditing, enabling data columns to be sorted to indicate how users have interacted with files, as well as the type of protocol. There is also now confirmation of login, shutdown and restart, as well as file transfer status and location details, in addition to report creation and delivery tools. The real-time data is displayed in a timeline along with a pie chart that includes protocol data, all of which can be viewed for detailed analysis of data related events at any time.

“Security has always been crucial for protecting valuable assets, and with increasing numbers of people moving files around from a variety of remote locations - including home - and between various platforms, we knew it was important to revisit our operating systems to exploit or improve every aspect of their protective environment,” said GB Labs’ Chief Product Officer, Howard Twine. “It is, of course, common to monitor a system and resolve security problems after the fact, using accumulated data, but what isn’t common is our ability to automatically monitor a system’s data - live - and flag up anything extraordinary. This is highly valuable in showing how people interact with a system and in identifying where any bottlenecks may be, unnecessary downtime is being wasted, or further efficiencies may be found.”

The upgraded CORE.4 OS with advanced security is currently being rolled out to existing GB Labs storage system users and will be available in all new systems from August 2020.

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