Tightrope And Burbio For Hyper-Local Event Info

Integration between the Cablecast platform and the Burbio service offers stations an automated, aggregated feed of rich community event data for their bulletin boards.

Tightrope Media Systems says it has partnered with Burbio, a digital platform that aggregates community event data from public sector organizations across the United States.

“The role of community media centers has evolved beyond their cable channels, becoming an essential communications vehicle for local residents,” said Michelle Alimoradi, marketing manager at Cablecast Community Media. “We are always looking for new opportunities to support our customers’ missions to keep their audiences informed and enhance their value to their communities. The ability for stations that subscribe to Burbio to bring its aggregated data into the Cablecast platform will provide significant time savings for our customers while helping cement them as the go-to resource for hyper-local event information.”

Integration between Tightrope’s Cablecast Community Media platform and Burbio’s zip code-level event database enables Cablecast customers to pull in hyper-local, automatically-updated calendar information for display in their broadcast and online bulletin boards.

Burbio’s co-founder and CEO Julie Roche was frustrated by the fragmentation of event data between numerous websites, emails and apps, leading her to build Burbio’s technology to organize it all in one place.

The combination of Cablecast and Burbio now lets media centers leverage this unified data to better inform their communities. Users can set parameters within the Cablecast CG or Carousel user interface to specify Burbio sources for each bulletin, and how many days or weeks of events to include – for example, pulling in a rolling seven days of school district events. The resulting bulletins are updated as Burbio refreshes its data.

“Local event data can be very difficult for local media to compile on their own, often relying on sources to submit their own events into calendars that may be incomplete, repetitive and time-consuming,” said Roche. “The Burbio platform was designed to overcome this challenge, and we’re thrilled to work with the like-minded team at Cablecast who are similarly focused on serving the needs of community media centers.”

Massachusetts-based Billerica Access Television (BATV) is one of the first community media centers to implement the Cablecast-Burbio combination. “Residents have commented on how great it is that we’re now listing more town events on our bulletin board,” said Kayla Creamer, programming coordinator at BATV. “This is another great service that can benefit our community, particularly those without easy access to a computer to check the town’s calendar online.”

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