OWC Announces ThunderBay FLEX 8 And ThunderBay 8 Storage

OWC has announced its new ThunderBay line, two products for Thunderbolt 3 connectivity with advanced storage options for videographers, photographers and others who use large amounts of data.

OWC said the ThunderBay FLEX 8 is a "3-in-1" solution involving storage, docking and PCIe expansion with Thunderbolt 3 support. It also features USB-C and USB-A connectivity. The ThunderBay FLEX 8 features a total of eight drive bays with support for up to 128TB worth of SAS, SATA and U.2 NVMe drives.

The ThunderBay FLEX 8 features an integrated DisplayPort 1.4 connection for connecting up to an 8K display. Built-in CFExpress and SD 4.0 card readers on the front of the enclosure make it possible to directly ingest images and videos to the internal drives. Other features include a PCIe x16 slot, 500 watts of power and SoftRAID software.

OWC will offer the ThunderBay FLEX 8 starting in the first quarter of this year. Customers will be able to order the enclosure on its own for use with their own drives or bundled with drives for 16TB to 128TB storage capacities.

Joining the new FLEX product is OWC's ThunderBay 8, a pro-grade Thunderbolt 3 storage solution that features eight hot-swappable universal drive bays with support for 2.5-inch and 3.5-inch HDDs and SSDs offering up to a total capacity of 112TB.

Users have the option of daisy chaining half a dozen units together for up to a 672TB storage capacity. The ThunderBay 8 is plug-and-play, features DisplayPort 1.2 for connecting a monitor and includes SoftRAID software.

The model will be available to purchase in the first quarter of 2020.

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