Ummet Ozcan Uses Genelec For Audio Monitoring

Sound designer Ummet Ozcan has built his dream private studio in the Netherlands, designed by acoustician and studio designer Jan Morel. At its heart, the studio uses a Genelec smart active monitoring system.

Ummet Ozcan.

Ummet Ozcan.

Ozcan has been making music since the age of 14, when his instinctive skill with the flute and keyboard were the first signs of an emerging talent. In the years since, he has produced not only a string of hit singles but also collaborations with peers including Paul Van Dyk and Tiesto, while continuing to push his own creative limits with the development of soft-synths and soundbanks.

His previous studios had disappointing acoustics and sound systems. Ozcan describes his new studio as “everything I’ve dreamed of for the last 15 years. When you close the door, you’re in a different world, it’s amazing.”

The Genelec smart active monitoring system consists of two 1234As installed as main monitors, accompanied by a 7382A subwoofer. Adding symmetry, what appears to be a second 7382A is in fact a customized bass trap designed around a Genelec grille.

In addition, two of the newly-launched 8351B coaxial point source monitors from The Ones range are installed on Ozcan’s desk for nearfield listening.

Towards the conclusion of the project, Morel and Ozcan shared the process of calibrating the Genelec monitoring system for the room. That work began with Genelec’s GLM calibration software, then was fine-tuned by ear.

For Morel, who has now designed private studios for some of the world’s most celebrated musicians, this is one of his proudest achievements. “This ranks as one of the top three studios that I’ve created,” he declares without hesitation. “Certainly for the design, this is number one.” 

You might also like...

Making Remote Mainstream:  Part 3 - Practical Challenges And Costs

In parts 1 and 2 of this three part series we discussed the benefits Remote Production has over traditional outside broadcasts, and the core infrastructures needed to make this work. In the third and final part of this series, we look at…

Advances In 12G-SDI:  Part 1 - Developing 12G-SDI

Since SMPTE formally standardized SDI in 1989, it has become the dominant video, audio and metadata transport mechanism for virtually all broadcast facilities throughout the world. Technology advances have not only made SDI incredibly reliable, but the specification has continued to…

Audio Levels - Part 2

The deciBel is a logarithmic ratio that happens to express quite well both the signal loss in transmission lines and the subjective sense of loudness in human hearing.

The Sponsors Perspective: Go Small To Go Big - Microservices Keep Broadcasters Ahead Of The Curve

The media industry is evolving faster than at any point in its history. Broadcasters and content producers are striving to meet consumers’ insatiable appetite for more content, rich viewing experiences, stunning images and access across all screens. As a result, i…

Making Remote Mainstream:  Part 2 - Core Infrastructures

In part-1 of this three-part series we discussed the benefits of Remote Production and some of the advantages it provides over traditional outside broadcasts. In this part, we look at the core infrastructure and uncover the technology behind this revolution.