Lume Cube Shows Lume Cube 2.0 At PhotoExpo In New York

Lume Cube is showing its Lume Cube 2.0, a tiny new LED light designed to perform in any environment and withstand all the elements. 

Lume Cube said version 2.0 of the light is 1.6-inches square with enough power to light an entire room. It is the smallest professional quality LED light for photo and video on the market.

The Panel.

The Panel.

Incorporating the latest in Imaging LED Technology and USB-C Charging, Lume Cube 2.0 represents the future of portable and powerful lighting for video. Emitting a daylight balanced 95+ CRI light, the new 80-degree beam angle lens provides a clean spread with zero hotspots.

Also being shown is Lume Cube’s The Panel, the first bi-color LED, made for the videographers and photographers who move quickly and need their lighting to adapt to any shooting condition.

Featuring an LCD screen on the back, The Panel not only allows users to adjust color temperature and brightness, but offers feedback on how long the LED will last at each brightness setting.

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