Glyph Announces Thunderbolt 3 Dock

Glyph has announced a Thunderbolt 3 dock that delivers additional ports, power and storage at faster speeds.

Glyph said the dock also charges a Thunderbolt 3 (USB-C)-enabled Macbook Pro with a single cable.

Atom Pro NVMe SSD.

Atom Pro NVMe SSD.

In addition to two Thunderbolt 3 ports, the Glyph dock supports Displayport 1.2, SD card slot (UHS-II), two USB 3.0 ports, USB 3.1 Gen2 Type-C port, separate audio and mic out, Gigabit ethernet and a user-upgradeable NVMe SSD slot.

The dock supports 87 watts of power delivery, a single 5K @ 60hz display or two 4K @ 60hz displays. SSD speeds are up to 1,500MB/s read and write.

Glyph also announced the Atom Pro NVMe SSD with read speeds up to 2,800 MB/s and write speeds reaching 2,450MB/s.

The SSD drive is built to handle the 4K, 8K and VR workflows and was designed to endure the elements with MIL-Standard 810F rating for shock, vibration, dust and sand.

The Atom Pro is small, bus-powered and silent thanks to its heat dissipating outer aluminum shell.

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