Broadcast Pix Uses Medialooks’ MFormats SDK For Remote UI

Broadcast Pix chooses Medialooks MFormats and WebRTC to power its remote camera control solutions.

The Broadcast Pix Commander enables users to view and control cameras and productions in full motion video in Chrome, Safari or Firefox; on any connected device. Buttons can be configured to trigger Broadcast Pix’s unique media–aware Macros to simplify operations, such as rolling clips, adding lower thirds or logos, displaying split-screen effects or remotely controlling robotic cameras, so streaming requirements are quite demanding.

“Since 2003, Broadcast Pix have pioneered integrated solutions that replace several devices requiring dedicated and trained operators,” explained Ben Taylor, Broadcast Pix CTO. “When it came to creating a remote user interface for viewing and controlling our systems we chose Medialooks as our partner because their highly flexible and powerful video SDK enabled us to create and manage streaming media formats saving development time - which in turn enabled us to maintain our market lead.”

He adds that Medialooks addition of WebRTC “made a very compelling case, both financially and technically as I was able to easily integrate the components creating an elegant solution much quicker than we could have done with any other tools.”

Taylor is now looking forward to what his team can do with MFormats to expand playback, streaming and local recording options not only to provide more streaming formats but also increase performance.

“We took a number of sample applications and looked at resource utilization and saw that CPU load and memory usage are less than they are with the tools that we have been using,” Taylor concluded “Performance is really critical for us, so we are looking forward to using it in other areas.”

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