Spiffy Gear Launches Lumee Wearable Bi-Color RGB LED Lights

Spiffy Gear has launched a new wearable LED light called Lumee that features a “slap bracelet” design with magnets for attaching it to metal surfaces. 

Spiffy Gear said the new light is splash-proof, rechargeable and offered in two varieties: an RGB model and a CRI 95, 2700-6500K bi-color model. Both are described as cine-grade with run times of up to one hour at full power and up to four hours at low power.

The Lumee lights from Spiffy Gear can “snap" onto poles, straps, wrists and other similar places like an old school snap bracelet. The light is also shipped with magnetic mounting discs for attaching the light to other surfaces. In addition to running off battery power, Lumee can be used while it is running off an external battery or charger.

The RGB version of Lumee offers five light effects: police, fire, TV, fireworks and breathing. The bi-color version of Lumee also offers light effects, though they're different due to the absence of colored LEDs: explosion, candle, breathing, stroboscopic and red carpet.

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