Essential Guide: Software COTS For Real Time IP Broadcast

A major development has happened in the broadcast industry with the adoption of software running on COTS servers for processing uncompressed real-time video. Up to recently, this had not even appeared on the radar, but new technology evolution and innovation has now made software COTS for broadcasters a reality.

This Essential Guide discusses the problem to be solved and the solutions to achieve it. We investigate the complex interaction of COTS server hardware and software needed to make real-time uncompressed video processing with low latency a reality.

Starting with the kernel, the generic solution is explained and why the software works in the way it does. We then uncover the inner workings of memory user-space and kernel-space to describe how software latency occurs and the strategies adopted to remedy it, such as kernel-bypass.

A detailed explanation of packet flow from the network interface card (NIC) through the kernel and into the user-space memory is given. Buffers and latencies are discussed and how the kernel-bypass and zero-copy methodologies are adopted to guarantee the high-speed data throughput and low latency demanded by broadcasters for uncompressed real-time video processing.

Sponsored by TAG Video Systems, a real-life example of a working software-COTS multiviewer is demonstrated. Multiviewers are arguably the most difficult systems employed in a broadcast facility as engineers rely on them heavily to provide a source of truth for confidence monitoring and reliability. TAG Video Systems explain how they achieved this.

Download this Essential Guide today to understand how uncompressed real-time video works on a software-COTS server. Understand kernel bypass and its interactions with the NIC’s, user, and kernel memory, to guarantee low latency high speed video delivery.

This Essential Guide is a fundamental requirement for anybody looking to build and deliver software-COTS infrastructures for real-time uncompressed video processing.

Supported by

You might also like...

The Future Of Performance Capture, Gollum, Apes And Andy Serkis

Andy Serkis has become the face - and body - of performance capture. The technology has allowed the creation of more convincing and realistic looking fantasy creatures, notably Serkis’ own standout roles as Gollum in the Lord of the Rings…

Essential Guide: Live HDR Down-Conversion

Live sports productions are the natural home for HDR. The increase in luminance latitude combined with extended color space delivers an immersive experience never before witnessed by the home viewer. But backwards compatibility must still be maintained for legacy SDR…

Essential Guide: Hybrid IP and SDI Test and Measurement

Broadcasters continue to see the benefits of IP and many are integrating piecemeal to build hybrid SDI-IP systems. At a first glance, monitoring of hybrid systems may seem to be just an extension of existing practices. However, the complex interaction…

Special Report: Super Bowl LIII – The Technology Behind the Broadcast

New England Patriot quarterback, Tom Brady, entered Mercedes Benz stadium in Atlanta, GA on February 3rd having already won five Super Bowl games. And through four-quarters of play, all delivered by a television crew of hundreds of technicians, sports casters…

Weather Channel Uses Immersive Mixed Reality to Educate Viewers About the Dangers From Winter Ice

In their latest hyper-realistic VR weather warning, The Weather Channel helps viewers better understand the potential dangers created by ice storms.