Pliant Technologies’ CrewCom Wireless Intercom Used At MLB All-Star Game

CP Communications used Pliant Technologies CrewCom wireless intercom system to provide wireless communication for the recent MLB All-Star Game and surrounding live events, including the Home Run Derby and pre/post-game ceremonies. 

Providing RF coverage throughout the stadium as well as additional on-site production locations, Pliant’s CrewCom provided all wireless intercom services for the weekend-long event in Cleveland, Ohio.

Michael Mason

Michael Mason

"Something that has always stood out to me about Pliant’s CrewCom system is that it doesn’t require much effort on the user end. You can pick it up and it just works,” said Michael Mason, president of CP Communications. “CrewCom is lightweight, ergonomic, feels comfortable and the battery lasts as long as I need it to. I couldn’t ask for more when it comes to a comms system.”

The coverage area needed for the MLB All Star game was fairly large. With its Control Unit (CU) housed in the production truck located across the street, approximately 1,000 feet from the house I/O, the system needed to span the distance to the stadium and then also cover several areas within the facility including in the bowl, in the hallways behind the dugouts, the production offices and the service hallway.

CrewCom’s new Fiber Hub provided the solution. Using multiple CrewCom four-volume Radio Packs and ten Radio Transceivers (RTs), the MLB commissioner’s office was able to be assigned to their own production intercom channels while also having a direct line for communications to the television trucks — ESPN for the Home Run Derby and FOX for the All-Star Game.

This setup allowed the MLB to communicate with directors and producers in the network trucks. Up to 36 Radio Packs with two Control Units can be used at once. The system can be expanded for additional users.

“Having the ability to connect the remote antennas directly off of the Fiber Hub increases the usability of the system. You can walk into a facility that is wired with single mode fiber, grab strands and go — there is no need to run additional copper or fiber,” said Mason.

You might also like...

Essential Guide: Improving Comms With 5GHz

As broadcasters continue to differentiate themselves through live programing and events, intercom is gaining more influence now than ever. This is especially true for large arena events where mobile crews demand the freedom of wireless connectivity. But as RF technology…

Audio Over IP Primer For Broadcast - Part 2

In Part 1 we introduced the benefits of Audio over IP and investigated some of the subtleties that make it the ideal choice for modern broadcast facilities. In Part 2, we look at the practicalities of making AoIP work in a real-time…

Audio Over IP Primer For Broadcast - Part 1

Our auditory system is incredibly sensitive to the smallest sound distortion or discontinuity. Even the slightest audio pop, stutter, or level clip grabs our attention and distracts us from the television or radio program. Consequently, vendors working in the audio…

Essential Guide: Audio Over IP Primer For Broadcast

Sound engineers have spent over twenty years implementing and improving audio over IP systems. This has given audio a head-start in the race to migrate to IP. Not only does the sound seamlessly transfer across networks but recent designs have…

Super Bowl to Use IP and Network-Based Audio

Every Super Bowl is a showcase of the latest broadcast technology, whether video or audio. For the 53rd Super Bowl broadcast, CBS Sports will use almost exclusively IP and network-based audio.