Samsung Announces 100-Plus Layer V-NAND Memory Module

Samsung has announced V-NAND modules with more than 100 layers — an advance expected to turbocharge video editing workstations.

Samsung said the 256GB three-bit V-NAND will be used to make SSD drives for PCs and has already been delivered to a number of global computer manufacturers.

The V-NAND module adds about 40 percent more cells to the previous nine-layer single-stack structure. This was achieved by building an electrically conductive mold stack with 136 layers. The process results in a write speed of 450 microseconds (㎲) and a reading response time of 45㎲.

When compared with older designs, performance has been increased by 10 percent and power consumption decreased by 15 percent. The company will be able to offer V-NAND products with more than 300 layers by combining three of the new stacks, without any negative impact. They will also be able to reduce production steps and reduce chip sizes, increasing production rates by 20 percent. 

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