Marquis Broadcast Focusses On Interoperability

Company to demonstrate Postflux, which improves sharing of Adobe Premiere Pro and After Effects projects, plus developments to Workspace Tools and Project Parking that feature support for the new Avid Media Composer OP1A workflows and Avid NEXIS Cloudspaces.

Postflux is intended to improve the archiving, versioning, integrity, security, performance and sharing of Adobe projects in extended workflows. Based on a client server architecture, individual editors have their own Postflux user logins. Postflux scans and analyses disorganised source project files and resolves all associated media. It then moves the project and media to a specified location, thus creating a new fully self-contained and organised Premiere Pro project. This makes exchanging projects simple and easy, plus allows the user to write to the most appropriate and pre-determined storage locations, whether on high-performance storage, removable storage or cloud.

Marquis Broadcast’s Managing Director, Paul Glasgow, comments, “Postflux simplifies and transforms the reliability of extended Adobe Premiere Pro project-based workflows. Missing media can be a nightmare for companies, so Postflux not only checks for this but also ensures project integrity from the point of origination through to archiving, helping transform production efficiency.”

Marquis’ Avid-certified Project Parking tool is for Avid storage management analytics and project portability, providing project analytics, visualisation, management and archiving. The latest version supports the new OP1A workflows as found in the new Avid Media Composer, supporting both parking and storage analysis. Project Parking and Workspace Tools now also integrate with Avid NEXIS Cloudspaces, which is accessed via the Avid connection client.

Project Parking’s new dashboard feature enables usage tracking for Marquis Workspace Tools and Project Parking systems. It has an improved look and feel for IBC2019, with a new analysis section providing clear information about storage usage across all customer sites.

Edit Bridge is used worldwide by production companies, broadcasters and post houses to integrate non-Avid editors and artists within Avid Interplay PAM or MediaCentral Production Management environments. The latest release includes a new search panel, which gives users the freedom to build flexible searches across the Interplay PAM database. The panel will operate in addition to the current browse panel, providing users with greater flexibility in how they access Avid assets.

Medway is a scalable media-centric middleware solution. New workflows, to be demonstrated at IBC, now enable relinking, integrating and archiving of Avid projects – both ground and hybrid cloud-based – especially useful when exchanging sequences between a main facility and remote editors.

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