Germany’s Lanxess Arena Expands Riedel Intercoms To Support Multiple Live Events

The Lanxess Arena in Cologne, Germany, relies on a comprehensive, Artist-based intercom communications network from Riedel Communications to streamline its broadcast and event production workflows. Since its completion in 1998, the sports and entertainment venue has relied on Riedel crew communications systems.

As the country's largest multifunctional arena, with up to 20,000 seats and 83,700 square meters of usable space, the Lanxess Arena has been hosting major events for over 20 years. Since the very beginning, the arena has also been the home of the eight-time German ice hockey champion Cologne Sharks.

Arena Management GmbH chose a decentralized Riedel comms solution based on two Artist-32 digital matrix intercom nodes, with one Artist frame in the production control room and a second one in the central technical area below the arena.

Arena Management GmbH chose a decentralized Riedel comms solution based on two Artist-32 digital matrix intercom nodes, with one Artist frame in the production control room and a second one in the central technical area below the arena.

Arena Management GmbH chose a decentralized comms system based on two Riedel Artist-32 digital matrix intercom nodes, with one Artist frame in the production control room and a second one in the central technical area below the arena. This two-frame strategy allowed technicians to access an existing network infrastructure beneath the facility to create required redundancies.

Due to its modular structure, the Riedel Artist ecosystem of products can be easily expanded to match the specific conditions of various Lanxess Arena events. The ability to integrate rented Riedel accessories, such as SmartPanels and Bolero wireless intercoms, has been particularly valuable for larger events and productions.

The Artist ecosystem with twenty-three 2300-Series SmartPanels enables flexible and creative workflows for the Arena Management GmbH production team. At Cologne Sharks hockey games, the communications system not only connects production, camera, sound, and lighting staff, but also integrates referees, house announcers, and the DJ.

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