Cobalt Supports Station’s Sub-channels With Broadcast Signal Processors

Digital sub-channels have allowed TV stations to utilize their allotted spectrum to create ways that also generate revenue. Cobalt Digital is working with major station groups and content originators to help them grow their channel ambitions with its line of signal processors.

Cobalt's 9922-FS/BBG-1022-FS broadcast signal processor offers optional features like easy-to-use monitoring and control options.

Cobalt's 9922-FS/BBG-1022-FS broadcast signal processor offers optional features like easy-to-use monitoring and control options.

The company is promoting its product line—available in both opengear-compatible and standalone form factors—as a good way to automate master control applications for these sub-channels and for channels that do not require DVE moves or scene transitions beyond just a simple cut from one video segment to the next. These processors also address FCC requirements—like loudness leveling (CALM), auto text-to-speech (21CVAA) and emergency alert crawls and voiceovers (EAS).

These station group engineers and consultants have been using a variety of control protocols (including GPIO, SNMP, XML, SCTE 104, Dashboard and an embedded HTML5 web-GUI) that are all supported by the Cobalt Digital processors.

The technology platform on which the 9922-FS (Ross Video opengear-compatible) card and standalone BBG-1022-FS product is built allows systems to be scaled as needed by adding more units. Products equipped with the factory-installed DSP daughter board support optional Linear Acoustic UpMax up mixing, Dolby loudness processing and Dolby AC-3/E-AC3 encoding and decoding (+Dolby E).

The unit also supports up to four discrete 3G/HD/SD/SDI inputs that can be SMPTE RP-168 clean switched between. A clean and quiet switching option is offered and passive relay protected rear I/O options are also available.

You might also like...

Improving Comms With 5GHz - Part 2

This is the second instalment of our extended article exploring the use of the 5GHz spectrum for Comms.

Improving Comms With 5GHz - Part 1

As broadcasters strive for more and more unique content, live events are growing in popularity. Consequently, productions are increasing in complexity resulting in an ever-expanding number of production staff all needing access to high quality communications. Wireless intercom systems are…

Lossless Compression: Rewriting Data More Efficiently

There are many types of codecs, all used for specific purposes to reduce file sizes and make them easier to distribute down a limited bandwidth pipe. Lossy compression and Lossless compression are the two most common categories of data compression…

Timing: Part 1 - Sidereal Or Solar?

The subjects of timing, synchronizing and broadcasting are inseparable and in this new series John Watkinson will look at the fundamentals of timing, areas in which fundamental progress was made, how we got where we are and where we might…

Latency Remains Thorn In Side Of Live Sports Remote Production

After years of trial and error designed to reduce operating cost and (more recently) keep crews safely distanced, remote production has found its niche in live production and will remain the de facto method for producing events over a distributed…