Florida’s First Baptist Church Adds TSL Products Control System To Manage New And Legacy Equipment

First Baptist Church of Jacksonville, Florida (FBC JAX), recently integrated TSL Products’ TallyMan control system in order to establish a flexible tally communication link between its legacy and new production equipment.

The TSL Products TallyMan allows users to achieve interoperability between equipment routed through analog, IP or hybrid networks, regardless of differing manufacturers and format specifications. This flexible approach to total control ensures a seamless shift from traditional broadcast environments to complete IP production and delivery in a remote setting.

With four distinct campuses across the city, FBC JAX was looking for a way to easily integrate a new Ross Video Ultrix 12G Router with the church’s 12-year-old Sony production switcher. Jay Ballard, Media Director at FBC JAX, says the TallyMan’s integrated capabilities and its interface library that spans current IP and legacy serial protocols provided the means he was looking for to achieve reliable interconnectivity between older and new equipment.

Volunteer staff love the new TSL Products system, as they don’t have to understand the underlying technology that makes it possible.

Volunteer staff love the new TSL Products system, as they don’t have to understand the underlying technology that makes it possible.

The TallyMan’s GUI enables users to establish seamless communication between all production equipment on a single, unified layer. It provides a diverse array of control resources, capable of acting as a standalone solution for small facilities or part of a multi-controller system for an infinitely expandable solution.

For live production, Ballard, who has more than 30 years of Pro A/V/L experience, said that TallyMan provides his team with “far better insight” than ever before, especially with six cameras operating at all times.

“Our volunteers love the new capabilities of our system, and they don’t have to understand the underlying technology that makes it possible,” he said. “Additionally, we no longer have to re-label every input and output on a route change, which equates to faster and more dependable configuration changes.”

While FBC JAX installed TallyMan from a tally integration perspective, Ballard says the ability to interface with numerous data protocols, as well as analog interfaces, has revealed additional capabilities of the system that can help to further streamline the facility’s workflow. In addition, TallyMan’s Virtual Panel Interface allows for an easily configurable process. With intuitive, drag-and-drop controls, users can customize production setups to fit specific needs.

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