Matrox Adds SRT Streaming Support To Mura IPX Encoder Cards

Matrox Graphics Inc. has added Secure Reliable Transport (SRT) streaming protocol support to its range of Matrox Mura IPX capture and IP encode/decode cards. The SRT open-source protocol and technology stack focuses on performance, reliability, and security for video delivery over private and public networks.

As SRT-ready products, the Matrox Mura IPX capture and IP encode/decode cards now allow OEMs and system integrators to build cutting-edge solutions capable of streaming and recording desktops, entire video walls, and selected regions of interest over both LAN and internet.

To capture a wide variety of physical, baseband sources, OEMs and system integrators can now mix and match 4K DisplayPort 1.2, 4K HDMI, and 12G-SDI card options. Matrox Mura IPX capture cards also include a dedicated onboard network interface controller (NIC) for unprecedented, high-density encoding and decoding of up to two 4Kp60, four 4Kp30, eight 1080p60, sixteen 1080p30, or exponentially more SD streams. Matrox Mura IPX cards are available in passive and active cooling options.

Matrox Mura IPX cards include a complete range of video wall software, APIs, and libraries. These software toolkits allow OEMs and developers to deploy intuitive, ready-to-use software and build custom interfaces and applications.

Fadhl Al-Bayaty, business development manager, Matrox Graphics, said that OEMs and integrators can couple Matrox Mura IPX’s capture, encoding, and decoding functionality with the SRT low-latency video streaming standard to bring out the best-quality live video—even across the most bandwidth-limited, unpredictable, or noisiest of networks.

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