Waves Plugins and eMotion LV1 Mixer Used For Eurovision 2019 Broadcast

The live sound team for the Eurovision Song Contest 2019 – senior audio broadcast engineer Omer Barzilay and front-of-house engineer Eran Ben Zur – choose Waves plugins and the Waves eMotion LV1 live mixer to power the sound of the Eurovision Song Contest 2019, broadcast live to over 200 million viewers.

Held annually for the 64th year, Eurovision is the world’s longest-running international television music contest, and one of the most-watched broadcast events worldwide. Broadcast from Expo Tel Aviv, May 14-18, Eurovision 2019 featured three live shows held over three days.

Omer Barzilay said Waves was the obvious choice for broadcast mixing. "When it comes to broadcast, you are usually looking for system redundancy and backups and the eMotion LV1 delivered just that. It is a clear advantage to have a software-based system. We were able to easily create two identical systems with two Waves SoundGrid servers each, and we created even more backups on our personal laptops.

Omer Barzilay

Omer Barzilay

“One of the greatest advantages of using the LV1 is that I was able to mix most of the songs ahead of time,” Barzilay continued. "I was mixing about a month and a half in advance of the show, at my studio, by routing all the stems that I received ahead of time from Pro Tools to eMotion LV1, creating all the automations and effects so they were ready for the show.”

Barzilay said during the show all audio was routed to the eMotion LV1 mixer and to a multi-track recording computer. “We used the LV1 mixer’s A/B input to route the recorder back in, so we could continue mixing the show between takes. This was very fast, and as soon as a delegation finished their first take, we kept mixing it until the next one. We didn't waste any time.”

The Schoeps Omni Channel plugin was the only channel strip used for all vocals, including de-essing, EQ, compression and saturation. On lead vocals, the Waves C6 Multiband Compressor was valuable in controlling high and low frequencies and for controlling pops and hisses. The Waves Dugan Automixer plugin was used for all hosts’ and guests’ mics.  

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