Riedel Offers New Node With 1024 Non-Blocking Ports In A 2 RU Package

Riedel Communications has released the latest addition to its Artist intercom ecosystem, called the Artist-1024. This new node is targeted at IP-based installations and those that need higher port densities. The Artist-1024 node can be added into any Artist fiber ring and is easily configured within the company’s Director configuration software.

The Riedel Artist-1024 node features higher port densities, full SMPTE 2110-30/31 (AES67) compliance, and 1024 non-blocking ports in a 2 RU package. It also introduces a range of technical innovations centered on software-definable Universal Interface Cards (UIC). This entirely new type of interface card combines networking, mixing and management, and can be configured to act as an AES67 or MADI subscriber card, or as an Artist fiber/router/processor card. Changing the connectivity type is as easy as reconfiguring the UIC with the click of a button in the Director software. The physical SFP modules are also changed with ease, e.g. from fiber to copper.

The frame provides ten bays for UICs, with two being reserved solely for routing and networking UICs. The remaining eight bays can be equipped with UICs of various configurations to provide subscriber connectivity. The integral mixer on each subscriber card can be scaled from 8 to 128 ports per card and can access all 1024 channels of the Artist backbone. In addition, four expansion slots are available for various GPIO or synchronization applications. Since UICs support internal sample rate conversion, each card can be connected to a different clock environment (MADI, PTPv2). An optional sync module can be used to sync to Wordclock, Blackburst, and PTPv2. From any sync source, the entire Artist system can be synced to any connected sync domain.

The Artist-1024 also introduces a new licensing scheme with frame-level licensing instead of connectivity-type licensing. Each node starts with a Virtual Artist Matrix (VAM) license, which includes a defined number of ports (16 to 1024) that can be freely distributed across the node’s subscriber cards. Besides these node-locked licenses, there are also licenses that allow for fast (re)configuration of the system by simply moving capacities between nodes. Since the licensing model does not involve connectivity, systems can be freely altered to meet any connectivity requirement.

The Artist-1024 has been architected with redundancy at its core. By supporting multiple redundancy schemes including N+1, NIC, and SMPTE 2022-7, it can provide an unprecedented degree of robustness and reliability. In addition to SMPTE 2022-7-compliant stream redundancy, there are several redundancy mechanisms in place to avoid single points of failure: The N+1 subscriber redundancy scheme includes a hot spare card that can take over the configuration of any other subscriber card while the NIC scenario allows a seamless handover between the two routing cards of a single node. All control logic and data links within the frame are redundant and the frame design provides additional security with two load-sharing PSUs and a fan module with dual fan units.

The frame design is rounded off by an e-ink display that provides configuration and licensing information, even when powered off. The Artist-1024 also offers flexible mounting options: The frame can be mounted with an off set of 0, 25, 50 or 75mm and can be rotated in the rack. If required, the ventilation can be reversed to provide efficient cooling in any situation.

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