KRK Ships ROKIT G4 DSP-Driven Audio Monitors 

KRK Systems is now shipping the ROKIT G4, a new series of audio monitors which includes 5-, 7-, 8- and 10-inch models that have been completely re-designed for DSP processing.

KRK said the ROKIT G4 line all feature an on-board DSP-driven Graphic EQ with 25 settings to help condition any acoustic environment. They are also the only monitors in their class with an LCD screen to display DSP-driven EQ settings. All system elements of the ROKIT G4 monitors work with advanced drivers made with Kevlar, efficient Class D power amplifiers and a front-firing port. This collectively extends accurate and tight bass reproduction and improves audio integrity while minimizing listening fatigue.

“If you compare the KRK G4 monitors with the G3s, you will instantly hear the difference between the two, especially on the low-end accuracy — it’s dimensional with a lot of detail,” said Jimmy Landry, global director of Gibson Brands, corporate parent of KRK. "The high-end is more open and detailed as well. With selectable DSP-driven EQ presets and an on-board LCD, the user experience has significantly improved – and we believe there isn’t a more complete studio monitor available at this price point that delivers such high-end performance.”

The KRK ROKIT G4 Studio Monitors feature a low resonance enclosure for minimal distortion and colorization, and a high-density ISO foam pad that decouples the speaker from the surface, which minimizes vibration transmission for improved clarity.

The bi-amp G4 product line includes RP5 (5-inch), RP7 (7-inch) and RP8 (8-inch) models for pristine near-field monitoring. An additional tri-amp RP10-3 (10-inch) version incorporates a 4.5-inch mid-range woofer and one-inch tweeter for mid-field monitoring. The RP10-3 can also be arranged in horizontal mode by allowing the user to rotate the mid-range woofer and tweeter by 90 degrees for more precise listening accuracy and versatility.

All G4 models feature a built-in brick-wall limiter, which automatically engages at maximum amp-level to maintain a balanced sound, protect the system and offer better and wider dynamics.  

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