Roland R-07 Update Brings Multiple-Unit Control and USB Mic Capabilities

At NAB, Roland released a firmware update for the R-07 High-Resolution Audio Recorder and its companion remote-control app.

iOS Interface

iOS Interface

Roland said the update brings newly expanded functionality that is ideal for videographers, web broadcasters, field recordists and journalists.

The R-07 already includes Bluetooth for remote operation and features Bluetooth-capable audio streaming enhanced with Qualcomm aptX Low Latency audio technology.

Using the free R-07 Remote app on an iOS or Android mobile device, users can wirelessly manage R-07 functions and monitor status and levels while the R-07 is placed in a prime recording location.

With the new Version 1.1 firmware, it is now possible to control up to four individual R-07 units at one time. This allows users to capture multiple sources at once, record a single source from different angles or capture redundant recordings of important events.

Each R-07 records its own audio source to an internal microSD card via its high-quality onboard stereo microphone, an external mic or a line-level device.

From the updated R-07 Remote app on a tablet, phone or Apple Watch, users can operate transport controls, recall scenes, view input levels, manage markers on up to four R-07 units.

The app shows an overview of each recorder with status and level meters, and individual units can be controlled more deeply with a simple tap. It is also possible to simultaneously control recording and other functions on all units as a linked group.

Another valuable feature added with Version 1.1 is the ability to use the R-07 as a high-quality USB microphone, audio interface and headphone amplifier for audio/video software on computers and compatible iOS devices.

This vastly improves the audio quality of iPhone video productions, and eliminates multiple pieces of gear when producing computer-based podcasts and live-streamed broadcasts.

The R-07 Version 1.1 update is a free download for all R-07 owners on Roland’s website.

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