Teradek Announces a Zero-Delay 4K Wireless Video Transmission System

Teradek has announced Bolt 4K, a wireless video system that offers 8x the reliability of previous HD models, 1.5x more range and superior image quality.

Teradek's Bolt 4K is the first 4K HDR wireless video system providing uncompressed, zero-latency (<1ms) transmission. Bolt 4K is interoperable, allowing any model range to transmit and receive from the other (i.e. a Bolt 4K 750 is compatible with a Bolt 4K 1500).

Bolt 4K transmits 10-bit, 4:2:2 HDR video at a range of up to 1,500 feet line-of-sight over the unlicensed 5GHz band, and can multicast to six receivers simultaneously.

For HDR workflows, Bolt 4K supports the HDR-10, PQ and HLG standards and can transport extended camera metadata, timecode and record triggers over the wireless link.

Like Teradek’s existing Bolt devices, Bolt 4K offers the industry’s best protection against prying eyes with AES-256 encryption and RSA 1024 key pairing. Combined, these two technologies ensure nobody can decrypt your wireless feed or connect another receiver to your system without explicit authorization.

To simplify the use of wireless video on set, Teardek launched a free iOS application to manage and monitor every parameter of Bolt 4K in real-time from a smartphone.

The app also offers a real-time quality and range analyzer to determine the best transmission distance for a given area as well as the popular 5GHz spectrum analyzer to detect congestion on specific channels.

Bolt 4K will begin shipping June, 2019 for $3,990 (Bolt 4K 750) and $7,990 (Bolt 4k 1500).

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