NetApp Storage With Integrated Axle ai Software

Arrow Distribution has a new range of integrated solutions for corporate and university video teams based on NetApp storage systems and software from axle ai.

Arrow, NetApp and axle ai are making the solutions available in three configurations: 100 terabytes of usable storage space (VM100), 200 terabytes (VM200) and 400 terabytes (VM400). All three configurations include NetApp’s storage architecture, with high-performance 10-Gigabit-Ethernet network interfaces, and NetApp’s powerful redundant FAS architecture.

Each configuration also includes an Intel-based application server running a 5-user version of axle ai 2019, the company’s ‘radically simple’ video search software. The software includes a browser front end allowing multiple users to tag, catalog and search their media files, as well as a range of AI-driven options for automatically cataloging and discovering specific visual and audio attributes within those files. “Given the large amounts of video - often terabytes - that can be accumulated by a video team in a single shoot, this system allows rapid search and management of those files,” said Sam Bogoch, CEO of axle ai. “For years, customers have expressed the need for a simplified and cost-efficient way to store, search and manage their content. Legacy solutions for broadcasters have been expensive and complex, but Arrow’s bundles manage to bring state-of-the-art AI and MAM (media asset management) capabilities to the corporate and educational customers who most need them. With these bundles, we are able to provide a tailored solution through Arrow’s nationwide network of resellers, and meet the needs of video teams as well as the IT departments who serve them.”
The solutions VM100, VM200, VM400 costs $49,995; $89,995 and $129,995 respectively.

Additional software upgrades include 5- and 50-user expansion packages, as well as axle ai's video metadata services including face recognition, object recognition, speech transcription and automated sports analysis, and axle ai's new connectr workflow solution.

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