Teradek Introduces Wireless Lens Control

At NAB, Teradek announced Teradek RT wireless lens control, debuting two new devices and an iOS app. 

Teradek introduced CTRL.3, a three-axis controller, and MDR.X, a compact three-axis smart receiver.

The new CTRL.3 controller offers precision lens mapping, allowing users to store and recall lens maps and display the information in real-time on SmallHD monitors. This integration for Teradek RT is available on all of the latest SmallHD monitors running OS3.

Integrated Bluetooth adds additional connectivity between the CTRL.3 and MDR.X or MDR.ACI receivers, allowing sharing of lens-mapping information as well as rapid configuration with the new free RT iOS application.

MDR.X is a fully-featured small and lightweight three-channel receiver that is camera-agnostic. Featuring integrated Bluetooth and a built-in OLED display, the MDR.X allows for quick configuration and real-time status updates.

Both the CTRL.3 and MDR.X are compatible with previous generation Latitude and MK3.1 RT products, making it simple to integrate into any existing RT workflow.

Teradek RT CTRL.3 is priced at $3499.95 and MDR.X is $1499.95. Both will begin shipping in May, 2019.

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