Dalet Goes For Remote Production Market

Dalet showcased its new Remote Editing framework in Las Vegas, claimed to bring the full editing capabilities and speed to editors working in the field or at remote offices without requiring a PAM/MAM at every location.

The software news, sports and reality TV productions with extensive in-the-field production needs. The Dalet Remote Editing framework connects users to the central content hub, enabling them to edit, assemble, collaborate and submit packages or download high-resolution media to finalize locally even in low-bandwidth situations.

The first release will support Dalet OneCut natively with subsequent updates supporting Dalet Xtend-compatible third-party editing applications like Adobe Premiere.

“With the Dalet Remote Editing framework, video editors located just about anywhere have the same robust editing experience as those editors located within the four walls of the central hub, even when they have a degraded network connection,” states Golan Tsarfaty, editing product line manager. “Most Dalet customers want to centralize content resources in the main hub yet have a local presence via their remote bureaus, freelancers or simply people working in the field. This new Remote Editing framework provides a gateway to optimize content sharing across multiple locations without requiring the deployment of a MAM or PAM beyond the central hub.”

The solution leverages the AWS infrastructure and Dalet smart-caching technology.

“It solves two key issues. First, it offers a high-quality user experience when editing content from anywhere; and second, it simplifies the network configurations and infrastructure management for access to central content by remote users,” Tsarfaty adds. “It’s an incredible technical innovation that is going to help our customers make a quantum leap forward with regards to mobility at work, remote productions and working with freelancers.”

At NAB 2019, Dalet demonstrated how the new editing framework lets journalists working in the field share with the central hub content they’ve captured locally, via a secure HTTPS Internet connection. Simultaneously, they showed how journalists preparing a story while on the go can preview and pull in content from the central catalog or the archive, and mix it with locally captured footage, using a stand-alone editor.

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