Lauten Introduces the LS-308 Noise Rejection Microphone

Lauten Audio has announced the LS-308, a large diaphragm condenser microphone designed as a problem solver for situations where noise rejection is needed.

From Lauten’s "Synergy Series," the LS-308 ($499) mic was designed for challenging recording situations when isolation is needed but difficult to achieve. The announcement comes a few months after shipping the Synergy Series LS-208 ($599.00 USD) front-address condenser microphone.

The LS-308 is billed as excellent for the close-quarters in broadcast voiceover booths when off-axis rejection is essential.

Unique to the LS-308 is its 270 degrees of side and rear off-axis rejection, reducing ambient sound from nearby sources by up to 25dB. This rejection is achieved because of Lauten’s dual, large-diaphragm pressure gradient transducer element design.

The LS-308 is a specific tool for recording engineers. It is for rejection of crowds, musical instruments and other sounds in a live studio or on-stage recording and sound reinforcement applications. It can also be used for multi-person close-proximity vocal dialog in noisy broadcast environments.

The LS-308 can handle sound pressure levels of 135dB without the need for internal or external pre-attenuation. This design also allows for an ultra-wide dynamic range and the capture of the full human audio perception of 120db of dynamic range. Many microphones are limited to 85dB of dynamic range after compensating for self-noise.

The new mic features independent, multi-stage, high and low-cut filters to help engineers balance recordings at the microphone and aid in successfully capturing a performance and reducing the need for mixing. The two-stage low-cut (50 and 120Hz) filters reduce low-end rumble and proximity effect in voice applications.

The LS-308 requires 48 volt phantom power and features a JFET transistor circuit with a transformer-based balanced output and a second-order cardioid pattern.

The new mic is constructed from high-quality components found in high-end studio condenser microphones, yet it is built and packaged to withstand the rigors of broadcast and touring. It features internally shock mounted condenser elements to help reduce mechanical shock and vibrations.

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