‘This is Life Live’ Made With Dejero

By transmitting high-quality video over multiple IP networks, Dejero’s EnGo mobile transmitter removed the need to hire satellite trucks and broadcast crews at each location - saving production company, Fly on The Wall’ time, resources and production costs.

The series airs human-interest ‘reveal’ stories live, over four consecutive nights from two different US cities simultaneously. FOTW’s back to back productions were supported by broadcast solutions provider and Dejero partner Bexel.

“It’s a very unique show that’s incredibly logistically challenging,” explained Jeff Anderson, executive in charge of production at FOTW. “Approaching season two, we wanted to find a solution that didn’t rely on the deployment of satellite trucks in both locations each night. Previously this required the deployment and briefing of two sets of production crews, troubleshooting for each, and basically reliving ‘Groundhog Day’ every time we hit the ground in a new city.”

For season two, FOTW used Dejero’s HEVC-capable EnGo mobile transmitter to transmit video over multiple IP networks, simplifying the show’s production cycle dramatically by removing the need to hire satellite trucks and broadcast crews at each location. 

“With any live unscripted production, the only way you can make it efficient is to keep it constant and remove the element of surprise and as many variables as possible. Dejero enabled us to do just that, and it translated directly into more efficiency and cost savings,” continued Anderson.

Dejero’s EnGo had already made FOTW’s on-site presence incredibly agile during the production of Katy Perry’s 96 hour live unscripted Witness World Wide! show in collaboration with YouTube last year. It worked using IP network connectivity and gave Anderson the idea to park a single satellite truck in Los Angeles during the production of the second season of ‘This is Life Live’ and use the same units to send signals back to the truck from any location across the country.

“You can’t ship a satellite truck, but you can ship an EnGo,” concluded Anderson. “The EnGo is solid, versatile, dependable, and quite an amazing piece of mobile technology. The decision was made for us when we tried it the first time; it’s a domino effect where the benefits add up.”

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