Don’t Miss These Two Popular Articles

Have you completed the design of your new all-IP facility? Most engineering directors have yet to complete such projects for at least a couple of reasons. First, budgets are insufficient, the current gear has not yet reached end-of-life and engineers want a choice in new (and fully-compatible) solutions.

Call me the skeptic, but the engineering adage, “I don’t want serial number one,” still comes to mind.

Having just finished reading an article about the upcoming rollout of Microsoft’s Windows 10 semi-annual update, it is obvious a huge number of professionals are rolling back update windows to prevent getting “serial number one.”

Yet, IP solutions are here (more will come) and engineers need to be ready to leverage the benefits. 

Few broadcasters have the benefit of implementing IP in a greenfield site and will instead be slowly and cautiously migrating IP into their existing infrastructures to meet their business demands. Upgrading from analogue to SDI had its challenges but could be quickly and easily achieved. And moving from SD to HD SDI was relatively straight forward.

As production and broadcast facilities migrate to IP, engineers must consider how they will interface their SDI, MADI, and AES systems together. Many see the benefit of IP and one day all devices will be IP-enabled. But until that time arrives, we need to understand how to interface new and old together.

In the article, IP - The Final Frontier 3 - All Together Now, editor and consultant, Tony Orme examines real applications and suggests ways to interconnect existing and new technologies.

An 8-bit video camera outputs pictures where the RGB values are quantized to one of 256 levels. A 10-bit camera quantizes to one of 1024 levels. Considering that because there are three color channels, an 8-bit camera can represent any of 16,777,216 discrete colors. A 10-bit camera may represent more than 1 billion colors. But can your eyes tell the difference? Are there other issues to consider?

Frank Beacham provides a tutorial on bits versus image quality in the article, 8-Bit vs.10-Bit Video: What's the Difference?

Going to NAB 2019?

This year, The Broadcast Bridge will be showcasing many of the technical sessions with brief articles. These articles will summarize key topics and presenters so you can plan in advance your attendance.

Don’t devote your time drooling over gear you cannot afford. Spend some time updating your technical skills while learning from the experts on how to improve your facility with new technology at the BEIT Conference at NAB 2019.

The Broadcast Bridge free exhibition pass is available through the image displayed above. Use registration code MP01.

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