Work Microwave Introduces Commercial V-Band Frequency Converters

Work Microwave, a German manufacturer of advanced satellite communications equipment, has announced the availability of what it’s calling the industry’s first V-Band frequency converters.

The converters are available in various sized outdoor housings and cover the full ITU uplink bandwidth range from 47.20 to 51.40 GHz, providing a full 4 GHz of bandwidth. As global consumption of bandwidth-intensive data and broadcast services increases, higher throughput satellites will be a requirement in the future.With V-Band-ready equipment, Work Microwave is helping the satellite industry tackle this important challenge.

“Over the years, we have seen the industry move into new bands, from C- to Ku- and Ka-Band, in order to relieve pressure on available bandwidth,” said Matthias Stangl, director of analog Satcom products at Work Microwave. “Now, it's time to make use of the tremendous potential of future-forward technology like the V-Band. We are excited to lead this industry initiative and address the emerging commercial need for high-frequency Satcom equipment."

Work Microwave's V-Band converters offer excellent phase noise, gain flatness, spurious response, group delay, and a multichannel architecture that allows wider coverage of each frequency band.

The company’s Satellite Communication division develops and manufactures high-performance, advanced satellite communications equipment for telecommunications companies, broadcasters, integrators, and government organizations that are operating satellite earth stations, satellite news gathering vehicles, fly-away kits, and other mobile or portable satellite communication solutions.

The new V-Band frequency converters will be on display at the company exhibit booth at the 2019 NAB Show in April.

Let us know what you think…

Log-in or Register for free to post comments…

You might also like...

Data Recording and Transmission: RF - Part 8

In part 8 of the series “Data transmission and storage”, consultant John Watkinson looks at some of the intricacies of RF transmission.

TV’s ‘Back to the Future’ Moment?

Philo T. Farnsworth was the original TV pioneer. When he transmitted the first picture from a camera to a receiver in another room in 1927, he exclaimed to technicians helping him, “There you are – electronic television!” What’s never been quoted but lik…

Cost-effective IP Contribution and Distribution

Saving dollars is one of the reasons broadcasters are moving to IP. Network speeds have now reached a level where real-time video and audio distribution is a realistic option. Taking this technology to another level, Rohde and Schwarz demonstrate in…

Articles You May Have Missed – May 30, 2018

A battle is brewing among some equipment providers focused on, you guessed it, more pixels. And, if history is any predictor, the broadcast and production industries may in fact soon be faced with managing images composed of approximately 33 million pixels.…

Unpacking The Repack: New Technology Can Speed The Process And Introduce Additional Benefits

The FCC has set out a tight timeline for broadcasters to vacate the 600MHz UHF band, and now the goalposts are moving. With mobile carriers itching to start using the spectrum freed up by the repack, some players like T-Mobile…