Work Microwave Introduces Commercial V-Band Frequency Converters

Work Microwave, a German manufacturer of advanced satellite communications equipment, has announced the availability of what it’s calling the industry’s first V-Band frequency converters.

The converters are available in various sized outdoor housings and cover the full ITU uplink bandwidth range from 47.20 to 51.40 GHz, providing a full 4 GHz of bandwidth. As global consumption of bandwidth-intensive data and broadcast services increases, higher throughput satellites will be a requirement in the future.With V-Band-ready equipment, Work Microwave is helping the satellite industry tackle this important challenge.

“Over the years, we have seen the industry move into new bands, from C- to Ku- and Ka-Band, in order to relieve pressure on available bandwidth,” said Matthias Stangl, director of analog Satcom products at Work Microwave. “Now, it's time to make use of the tremendous potential of future-forward technology like the V-Band. We are excited to lead this industry initiative and address the emerging commercial need for high-frequency Satcom equipment."

Work Microwave's V-Band converters offer excellent phase noise, gain flatness, spurious response, group delay, and a multichannel architecture that allows wider coverage of each frequency band.

The company’s Satellite Communication division develops and manufactures high-performance, advanced satellite communications equipment for telecommunications companies, broadcasters, integrators, and government organizations that are operating satellite earth stations, satellite news gathering vehicles, fly-away kits, and other mobile or portable satellite communication solutions.

The new V-Band frequency converters will be on display at the company exhibit booth at the 2019 NAB Show in April.

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