Point Source Audio Announces CO2 Confidence Collection Microphones

Point Source Audio has introduced a new class of wireless microphones with dual elements that offer built-in redundancy.

Point Source said the new microphones integrate two of the company’s important features in miniature microphones: IP 57 waterproof rating and the “unbreakable” headset boom bendable to 360-degrees to bolster durability.

All this unlocks new conveniences and simplicity for broadcast, audio and production technicians. The CO2 Confidence Collection microphones are shipping February 4th.

“Double mic'ing can be heavy lifting when it comes to the cabling and their clutter; that’s why our CO2 Confidence Collection is specifically intended to ease the workload of many working in live mic applications,” said Yvonne Ho, Point Source Audio's vice president of sales and marketing. “The new form factor pairs our smallest elements at roughly 3mm each to create a dual mic’ing system that is barely detectable.”

The double mic’ing setup of the CO2 Confidence Collection comes in three popular styles: headset, lavalier and in Point Source Audio's EMBRACE over the ear configuration. The backup element is fashioned to the existing mic in tandem and where the independent and continuous wire paths are integrated into a singular wire jacket giving audio technicians a clean alternative to cumbersome cable dressing.

Each mic element is sonically matched to ± .05 dB. The second element practically disappears. Both elements are IP 57 waterproof and the single cable splits to two packs. The mic elements are protected against damage from water, sweat and makeup. They’re immersible to one meter for up to 30 minutes without damage. Both ends of the screw-on X-Connector now have locking “teeth” to give added confidence to the connection.

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