Do Not Miss These Two Tutorials on Cable and IP

Does size matter? Yes it does.

When purchasing Cat5e, Cat6 or Cat6a network cables, buyers may notice an AWG specification printed on the cable jacket. AWG is a standardized system for describing the diameter of the individual conductors that make up a cable. But what does wire gauge mean?

To begin, AWG stands for American Wire Gauge. To understand the differences between similar network cables with different AWG sizes, it is helpful to look at what wire gauge means.

The first thing to learn about wire gauge is its inverse relationship to wire diameter. The smaller the gauge, the larger the diameter of the wire. The larger the diameter of a wire, the less electrical resistance there is for the signals it carries.

The thinner conductors may limit the length of slim cables and make them more prone to damage, but the smaller cable OD can provide some benefits, such as improved airflow in high-density racks, improved visibility of port labels on patch panels and other network equipment, easier installation in crowded racks and simpler routing of cables around corners and through cable managers.

Want to know more about wire and cable? Read the article, “How 24 AWG, 26 AWG and 28 AWG Network Cables Differ.”

As broadcasters accelerate IP migration we must move from a position of theory to that of practical application. Whether we’re building a greenfield site or transitioning through a hybrid solution, simply changing SDI components with analogous IP replacements will not achieve full COT’s goals and the benefits associated with it.

Migrating to IP provides broadcasters with infrastructure flexibility and scalability. Traditional SDI solutions have stood the test of time, but they are rigid. Moving from SD to HD required large parts of the SDI infrastructure to be replaced as 270Mbit/s SD systems are not compatible with 1.485Gbit/s systems. Early adopters of HD could not move to progressive HD without changes to infrastructure. And the emerging UHD, 4K, and 8K formats are difficult to build with SDI technology.

IP is the way forward, but what can engineers do now?

Consultant and The Broadcast Bridge Technology editor, Tony Orme, provides practical answers in his tutorial, IP Explored - ST2110 and ST2022.

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