New MuxLab Extender Supports H.264/265 Video Codec

​MuxLab’s next generation HDMI over IP transmitter brings AV sources together with various displays on the same IP infrastructure.

The solution boasts high image quality with less than 200ms latency in low latency mode with H.265. Because the system is limited only by network bandwidth, potentially hundreds of sources and displays can be integrated into the same system providing excellent scalability.

By connecting to an Ethernet switch, users can easily create simple distributions of matrixed displays on even massive video walls with multi-views — and exceptionally low bandwidth requirements allow for streaming AV over a local network, Wi-Fi, and the Internet.

4K@30Hz AV over IP Transmitter Workflow Diagram. Click to enlarge.

[email protected] AV over IP Transmitter Workflow Diagram. Click to enlarge.

Each of MuxLab’s transmitters can connect AV equipment to a network up to 100m in distance over standard CAT5e/6 cable. Once on the network, the transmitters work with the company's H.264/H.265 Receivers (model 500762) supporting a one-to-one or one-to-many display configuration..

Video is up-scaled to [email protected] from [email protected] or [email protected] for flawless imagery. Two channel audio is embedded and delivered alongside HDMI to the display or extracted at the Receiver. PoE is supported on both the transmitters and receivers, eliminating power supplies at local and remote locations.

When used with the company's ProDigital Network Controller (model 500811), every piece of equipment can be set up, managed, accessed and controlled locally or remotely from any laptop, smartphone or tablet. The new MuxControl App, available for both iOS and Android, provides complete mobility and intuitive control. This system can also be integrated with third party Apps, and can control end devices via traditional RS232 and directional IR.

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