The Broadcast Bridge Published Over 200 Articles Last Month

It was a busy October for the editors at The Broadcast Bridge. Last month we published more than 200 feature articles, tutorials, essential guides and new product information. A reader could be excused for missing some of that content, especially in light of the multiple exhibitions and conferences that took place in the same time frame.


To help The Broadcast Bridge members and readers stay current and not miss key technological developments and tutorials, here are two articles we believe you will find highly interesting and valuable.

Looking to take advantage of distribution and cost benefits, many broadcasters have expressed an interest in migrating to full IP infrastructures. However, if you’ve got a full complement of baseband equipment and workflows that your team is familiar with, it might not be practical to attempt a complete overhaul in a facility.

There are basically three different ways to tackle the migration to IP infrastructures. The first would be a greenfield approach where a facility basically eliminates the current SDI gear replacing it with IP solutions. Efficient, but expensive.

Another tactic is to wade into IP waters by working first with audio streams, which tend to be smaller than video streams and thus easier to move around. In this way, staff can become familiar with IP packet switching and the network topologies that are required to make IP infrastructures successful.

Finally, a “Hybrid” approach allows the use of SDI and IP equipment side-by-side while deploying IP Gateways or transcoding systems to port SDI signals to IP or receive signals from the IP realm. In this tutorial, Riedel’s MediorNet is used as an example of a method to build a hybrid facility, one where both baseband and IP work together in harmony. See the article, “Taking The Hybrid Approach On The Road To IP.”

The IP media network puzzle remains uncompleted, but an endpoint may be in sight.

The IP media network puzzle remains uncompleted, but an endpoint may be in sight.

Many engineers believed that the release of SMPTE 2110 was sufficient to ensure compatibility for all the gear in a media IP-centric environment. Not so, the standard defines the transport layer only. Complying with ST 2110 will only guarantee a signal will pass through a compliant network and can be decoded by a compliant device. It doesn’t specify the IP addressing schemes, multicasting schemes, codec types, bit rates, formats, etc. Currently, all these parameters for each device must be manually configured, making automation difficult. Enter NMOS.

NMOS stands for, Networked Media Open Specification and it is being developed through an organization called AMWA-Advanced Media Workflow Association. AMWA is the group developing the network protocols that ST 2110 needs to operate on an IP network. Read about this important IP component technology and why it is key to creating an effective IP infrastructure and workflow in the article, “What is NMOS?

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With such a wealth of information generated daily, it is important to not get left behind.

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