Chandler and Abbey Road Studios Introduce the EMI Abbey Road Studios TG Microphone

Chandler Limited, the only company authorized to develop, manufacture and market EMI/Abbey Road equipment, has introduced the TG Microphone to its historic microphone lineup.

Conceived by Chandler Limited founder and chief designer, Wade Goeke, the TG Microphone — following the mold of the REDD Microphone — is unique in design, functionality and sound. The TG Microphone isn’t a clone of any other microphone.

The TG Microphone is a solid-state, large diaphragm condenser microphone, featuring — as the name implies — the legendary TG sound, a ‘Dual Tone’ voicing system and on-board NAB/IEC “Tape Equalizer” facility, re-purposed from historic EMI TG12410 transfer (mastering) consoles and re-engineered for microphone duties.

While TG Microphone’s historic TG color comes from its incorporation of three TG amplifiers, its ‘larger than solid-state’ sonics are enabled by its reliance on a dedicated power supply.

The TG Microphone features selectable cardioid and omni pickup patterns.

System 'A' offers the classic TG mid-forward sound — perfect for vocals and acoustic instruments. The alternate 'B' voicing excels at handling extreme SPLs and sounds great on kick drums, bass instruments, guitar amps, brass and more — similar to the legendary FET47. TG Microphone is also equipped with a -10 dB pad for those moments when you really need to crank it up to 11.

The TG Microphone also includes a dedicated power supply (PSU), eschewing the use of traditional 48 volt phantom power to provide a larger-than-solid-state sound. TG Microphone also includes a custom shock mount, 25-foot Mogami four-pin mic cable and wooden storage case. Price is $1849.

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