​Elements Demos All-NVMe Media Storage at SMPTE LA

ELEMENTS will be introducing its Non-Volatile Memory Express storage solution to the US market at the upcoming SMPTE conference. The unit provides up to 80TB of storage capacity and says it handle 8K DPX workflows with more than 20GB/sec, providing both 100Gb Ethernet and 32Gb Fibre Channel connectivity.

“SMPTE attracts the world’s most innovative technology leaders, and we are excited to show them our product portfolio, including our new all-NVMe storage appliance, at the organization’s annual conference and exhibition.” says André Kamps, CEO, Elements. “The all-NVMe solution delivers performance beyond belief, with incredible high-bandwidths, zero latencies and more than double the throughput – a huge benefit for all media workflows.”

Rendering tasks are also accomplished on the storage platform at “a notably accelerated pace” claims the firm due to the high-level of Input/Output Operations per Second (IOPS) rates.

“The high density of the hardware design makes the new system environmentally friendly, reducing the total cost of ownership due to significantly lower power requirements,” says Kamps.

At the SMPTE exhibition ELEMENTS will introduce its new all-NVMe storage solution to the US market. Housed in a slick 2U unit with all Non-Volatile Memory Express (NVMe) drives, the new ELEMENTS all-NVMe provides up to 80TB of raw storage capacity. The storage solution targets users that place a premium on speed by delivering unparalleled performance, even for 8K DPX workflows with more than 20GB/sec, providing both 100Gb Ethernet and 32Gb Fibre Channel connectivity. Rendering tasks are also accomplished at a notably accelerated pace due to the high-level of Input/Output Operations per Second (IOPS) rates. The high hardware makes the new system environmentally friendly, reducing the total cost of ownership due to significantly lower power requirements.

ELEMENT's features and tools are accessible through a web-based HTML 5 graphical user interface, including the embedded Rough Cut Editor for editing original film material remotely.

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