Haivision Makito X and KB Encoders Now Interface with Microsoft Stream

Haivision recently announced that the company’s portfolio of professional-grade encoders can now be leveraged with Microsoft Stream to provide broadcast-quality live-event streaming.

Haivision is making its Makito and KB encoders available for use with Microsoft Stream. Haivision customers can now easily select the Haivision encoder option and take advantage of presets that configure it for the best results and allow users to start streaming live events quickly from any location.

Haivision’s Makito X encoders provide ultra low latency, high quality HD video encoding within compact, portable appliances. Haivision’s KB encoders deliver the highest quality video streaming within compact, portable appliances (KB Mini, KB Max) or as rack mountable enterprise-grade servers.

Microsoft Stream, the intelligent video service in Microsoft 365, recently introduced new live event capabilities. One way this feature empowers organizations, is to enable executives to connect and communicate visually with employees around the globe with live-streamed company-wide events. By delivering broadcast-quality live HD video into Microsoft Stream, Haivision’s high performance Makito X encoders and KB Series internet streaming encoders help ensure C-level executives look and sound their very best to employees watching across the globe.

“The enterprise-grade Makito X and KB Series of encoders are a perfect match to Microsoft Stream for live events – easy to set up and easy to provision, with broadcast quality that is ideal for corporate and professional video webcasts,” said Sylvio Jelovcich, vice president of global alliances, Haivision. “Our work with Microsoft Stream and Microsoft 365 will help make it easier for customers to securely and reliably stream live events and connect more effectively with employees and internal audiences across their organization.”

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