Timecode Systems Releases Timecode-Over-Bluetooth Solution: UltraSync Blue

Timecode Systems has introduced UltraSync Blue, which transmits time-codes to recording devices over Bluetooth with sub-frame accuracy.

The Timecode Systems UltraSync Blue measures just 55mm x 43mm x 17mm, and weighs a mere 36g; small enough to fit neatly into a pocket. It is affordable and can therefore be used for any type of production — from documentaries, news gathering, and reality shows to wedding videos and independent films.

By removing the restrictions of wired connections, crews not only benefit from the convenience of being cable-free, but also from increased versatility in content syncing. 

Another unique feature of the UltraSync Blue is the ability to use a single unit to sync up to four recording devices shooting in close range over Bluetooth. This makes it a great option for small shoots and interviews, and also for content captured for vlogs and social media.

Ultra Sync Blue

Ultra Sync Blue

The solution is also designed to work seamlessly with the rest of the company's product range. 

For more complicated shoots, sprawling filming locations, and recording using a variety of professional equipment, the solution can be connected to devices over Bluetooth and then synced over robust, long-range RF to other camera and audio recorders using Timecode Systems units. 

This also includes any equipment containing a the company's OEM sync module, such as the AtomX Sync module (which was recently launched by Atomos for the new Ninja V).

Timecode Systems is working with manufacturers and app developers to adopt its new super-accurate timing protocol into their Bluetooth-enabled products. At launch, both the MAVIS professional camera app and Apogee MetaRecorder app (both for iPhone) are already fully compatible, allowing — for the first time — sound and video recorded on iPhone devices to be synchronized over the company's network.

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