Two ST 2110 Interfaces From Studio Technologies for AES New York

Since SMPTE ST 2110 achieved full standardisation, more manufacturers have been releasing products that comply with the media transport standard. Among these is interface and intercom company Studio Technologies, which will show two new units for Audio-over-Ethernet (AoE) networking at the AES New York exhibition.

The Studio Technologies Model 5512 audio and Model 5518 mic/line interfaces will receive their Stateside debut in the AIMS (Alliance for IP Media Solutions) audio over IP (AoIP) Partner Pavilion.

The Model 5518 has eight analogue microphone or line-level sources and is able to output feeds over Ethernet using ST 2110. It is also able to receive eight ST 2110 audio channels and convert them into analogue line-level signals.

The Model 5512 comes in two versions: one featuring eight inputs and eight outputs; the other with 16 inputs and 16 outputs. Both support analogue line-level inputs and outputs and, like the Model 5518, incorporate redundant stream operation via two Ethernet interfaces conforming to ST 2022-7.

In addition the 5512 and 5518 feature three Gigabit Ethernet interfaces; two are for ST 2110-30 essence stream transport, while the third gives access to the management menu.

Commenting on the new releases and incorporation of ST 2110, Gordon Kapes, president of Studio Technologies, said, "Evolving standards and interoperability are major talking points across all of pro audio. For audio signals within the broadcast environment, we see ST 2110-30 as having great potential. In response we have created two new audio interfaces that can be directly integrated into ST 2110-compliant workflows. AES Conventions play an important part in presenting the future of audio and we look forward to exhibiting as part of AIMS Pavilion."

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