Fujifilm Cabrio 20-120mm Zoom - Servo Now an Option

Fujifilm has introduced a new version of the Cabrio 20-120mm zoom lenses without the servo drive motor, putting ownership within reach of larger cinema customer base. The lens without drive can be operated as a fully manual, parfocal, cinema zoom lens.

Fujifilm’s Fujinon XK6x20 zoom (better known as the Cabrio 20-120mm) is now available with or without an attached servo unit. The servo drive on other Cabrio Series lenses is interchangeable on the 20-120mm if the 20-120 is purchased without a drive unit.

Designed to be convertible between the video production and cinema markets, the Cabrio 20-120 features a flat T3.5 aperture from end-to-end, with no ramping. It covers a super-35 size sensor. Without the servo drive, it can easily accept industry-standard cine motors and matte boxes. The Cabrio 20-120mm is fit with a nine-blade iris to capture the most natural looking imagery and most pleasing bokeh possible. The zoom’s barrel markings are luminous for visibility in dark shooting situations, and distances are listed in feet or meters.

Third-party camera and lens support providers are offering solutions to benefit users of the Cabrio 20-120mm without a servo. Among them, Chrosziel and Hedén have designed lighter weight servo zoom motor solutions for the 20-120mm. Since TV camera operators often need to hold the camera for 8-10 hours a day, saving 20% of the weight of the lens is a big deal to an operator and operator and these lightweight third-party drives integrate seamlessly with Sony’s FS series zoom controllable hand grip.

Duclos Lenses and IBE (Germany) offer EF mount and multi-mount kits for the 20-120mm.

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