MainConcept Enables Canon XF-HEVC Workflows

MainConcept announces it has added support for ingesting HEVC 4:2:2 files generated by the new Canon XF 705 camera to its HEVC/H.265 Decoder SDK.

MainConcept at IBC announced support for the new Canon XF 705 camera. The Canon camera is among the first to leverage the higher compression efficiency of HEVC/H.265 to store data and while simultaneous recording HDR and SDR without doubling storage space requirements. The camera places 4:2:2 10-bit HEVC/H.265 into an MXF container, which allows existing workflows to support the same metadata as with current, AVC/H.264-based broadcast formats.

The video codec company, MainConcept, worked closely with Canon to ensure interoperability and reliable ingest of files captured by the XF-HEVC capable cameras. Editing and media asset management applications can easily ingest or playback the new format natively by integrating the MainConcept HEVC/H.265 Decoder SDK version 10, which was released at IBC 2018. This SDK includes components for video and audio decoding as well as MXF demultiplexing.

“MainConcept has a long history of successful collaboration with professional camera manufacturers” said Thomas Kramer, VP Product Management for MainConcept. “Being the select partner for Canon’s release of their XF camera line is yet another important milestone in enabling native ingest workflows in our customers’ applications. Canon’s appreciation for HEVC/H.265 as a recording and production format underlines the importance of this most efficient codec in the professional production space.”

“We are proud to work with MainConcept as our software partner” said Edakubo Hiroo, Deputy Chief Executive at Canon’s Image Solutions Business Operations. “They provide the most reliable codecs and great interoperability that companies require when ingesting recorded content. Many of the broadcast software vendors in the market rely on MainConcept SDKs and can now enable their workflow applications with ingest and playback support when we launch our new camera at IBC.”

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