Cost-effective IP Contribution and Distribution

October 1st 2018 - 03:00 PM
by Tony Orme, Technology Editor at The Broadcast Bridge

Saving dollars is one of the reasons broadcasters are moving to IP. Network speeds have now reached a level where real-time video and audio distribution is a realistic option.

Taking this technology to another level, Rohde and Schwarz demonstrate in this eBook how to reduce costs even further and provide contribution and distribution over the internet.

This eBook starts by reviewing the current state of IP migration and what is possible with existing technology. Then it reviews traditional broadcast distribution systems such as satellite and point-to-point networks, and then goes on to compare the cost savings internet contribution and distribution achieves.

Download this eBook today and learn why OTT vendors have been able to achieve internet delivery when broadcast contribution and distribution has proved so challenging.

And understand the solutions to achieve broadcast quality internet real-time video and audio contribution and distribution. 

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