Roswell Pro Audio Introduces the Colares Microphone

Roswell Pro Audio has introduced the Colares Microphone, a new high-end condenser microphone designed especially for voice applications.

Roswell said the Colares uses a transformer-coupled JFET circuit topology to produce musical harmonic saturation and has an edge-terminated capsule. The pad switch reduces both level and harmonic coloration, and a three-way filter switch allows the choice of three low-frequency rolloff points, to compensate for mic placement and proximity effect.

Every Colares mic is hand-built, tuned and tested in Roswell Pro Audio's Northern California headquarters. The mic ships in a custom, heavy-duty flight case, with a Rycote shockmount.

The Colares retails for $1,259.

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