The Migration to IP: The Revolution Continues

Are you an IT engineer having trouble figuring out why the phones, computers and printer systems work but the networked video doesn’t? Or maybe you have 10-15 years of experience with video production equipment but really don’t understand why the rack room is filled with things called “switches.” Help for both levels of expertise is just ahead.

It seems that, today, everyone is an expert on IP and how to best use the technology in audio and video applications. That’s just another way to say, “I’m from the government and I’m here to help you.”

What engineers really want is a hand up in the form of accurate information—not sales pitches and wild stories about the benefits and lower OPEX of IP.

The Broadcast Bridge, a leading resource for engineers needing to design, install and maintain modern video and audio systems, has more than one thousand articles on technology. The website relies on top-drawer experts who understand IT and the broadcast and production industries. These writers have been in your shoes and appreciate the challenge you face.


Tony Orme, The Broadcast Bridge technical editor has many years of experience as a broadcaster and consultant in media facilities. He understands the pressures of these fast-pace environments. He lives and breathes IT from an engineer’s viewpoint. And, he really is here to help.

Orme’s latest book, Broadcast for IT is a 20-chapter treatise on IT systems, video and audio technology, and practical guidance in making the technologies play nice with each other.

The 20 chapters in the book Broadcast for IT are listed below: 

  • Introduction
  • Video Frames
  • Video Lines
  • NTSC Line and Frame Relationships
  • PAL Line and Frame Relationships
  • Counting Time in 59.94
  • Color and Temperature
  • Color Representation
  • Color Space
  • SDI Systems
  • Sensors
  • Lenses
  • Analog Audio
  • Microphones
  • Digital Audio
  • Video Compression
  • Compression Formats
  • Quality Control
  • Why Use IP?
  • IP Systems

Reading the book is like talking with a fellow engineer. Tony understands the difficulty in learning these new systems and he communicates through the use of precise language and practical examples. The conversation addresses the benefits of IP routing and their built-in resilience. The reader quickly grasps the enormous differences between a ‘video’ and ‘IP’ router. Inputs and outputs are now ports. And ports can be either an input or an output. Being able to explain such key points in a clear and understandable manner is a gift Tony Orme brings to this book.

The new book, “Broadcast for IT” is now available for purchase below.

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