InSync Announced New Integration Partners and Products at IBC 2018

At IBC2018, InSync announced several new integrations, including deployments within Dalet AmberFin and other MAM systems, Marquise Technologies’ MIST mastering system, and the Hiscale FLICS transcoding environment.

InSync's FrameFormer is a software motion compensated standards converter that is available as a plug-in for edit software such as Adobe Premiere Pro and Final Cut Pro X, as a component in Imagine Communications' SelenioFlex File, and as a stand-alone application. FrameFormer runs under Linux, Windows, and Mac operating systems and targets CPU-only deployment for maximum flexibility.

On the stand were demonstrations of Hiscale FLICS Integration for a Cloud Pay-Per-Use Converter Option. Broadcasters and content owners often face unexpected needs for frame rate and format conversion. For example, footage that was expected to be 1080 50i turns out to be 720 30p, and there's no option to re-shoot, or a client requests a clip for integration into a UHD 59p program, but the only version on the server is HD 50i. Keeping a standards converter on standby for such situations is not cost-effective.

At IBC2018, a new option for a pay-per-use standards conversion solution was demonstrated — FrameFormer for FLICS. The demonstration showed the outstanding quality available from the FrameFormer standards converter within the Hiscale FLICS video transcoding platform.

FrameFormer for FLICS standards conversion.

FrameFormer for FLICS standards conversion.

Visitors to the stand saw results of the FrameFormer software motion compensated standards converter converting a range of UHD content between multiple different frame rates. The demonstrations allowrf customers to see up-close the superb quality available with FrameFormer and its ability to handle a wide range of material, including content produced with High Dynamic Range.

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