K-Tek Introduces Stingray Sun Hat for Sound Mixers and Boom Ops

K-Tek has debuted the first Stingray hat especially designed for sound recordists working outdoors. The Sunhat not only provides heat and sun protection but fits over-the-ear headphones.

The K-Tek design features an ample opening over each temple with magnetic snaps, so users can wear the hat, put headphones on, slip the earphones through the openings and close the magnetic snaps of the brim.

The Stingray Sunhat is constructed of a special sand-colored, lightweight fabric that is categorized as UPF50, which is rated as “excellent” by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). This material blocks 98 percent of the sun’s UVA and UVB rays.

The half brim offers ample shade in the front and a built-in neck cover offers more protection. Various cooling vents maximize comfort. The one-size-fits-all design incorporates an adjustable elastic sizing band. The integrated chinstrap ensures the hat stays in place, even during a windy day on location.

Although the Stingray Audio Sunhat was designed for professional sound recordists on location, there are other practical applications as well. Its design allows for over-the-head hearing protection, earmuffs or any ear muff style on-the-ear or over-the-ear headphones.

The K-Tek Stingray Sunhat is machine washable without losing its UV protection. Available now, the hat costs $50.

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