Infineon’s Digital MEMS Technology Enables Zylia ZM-1 Microphone Array

Germany’s Infineon Technologies AG and Zylia, a Poland-based developer of recording technologies, have collaborated to enable a single microphone array for portable recording.

The integration of Infineon's 69dB SNR digital MEMS microphone into the Zylia ZM-1 microphone array provides a new approach to music recording. The 19-capsule microphone array with high-end 24-bit recording resolution allows users to record entire sound scenes with one microphone.

Equipped with XENSIV silicon microphones, the microphone array delivers high-fidelity and far-field audio recording. In addition, it provides multiple-microphone noise- and distortion-free audio signals for advanced audio signal processing.

Advanced digital sound-processing algorithms and microphone array technology make the Zylia ZM-1 a lightweight recording solution. The XENSIV silicone microphones feature with low self-noise, wide dynamic range, low distortion and a high acoustic overload point. The Zylia Studio application for the ZM-1 enables separation of instruments and vocal tracks from the overall recorded sound mixture.

As a third-order Ambisonics audio recorder, the ZM-1 is also suitably robust for 360-degree and virtual reality (VR) audio production. Zylia supports these workflows with its new Zylia Studio PRO and Zylia Ambisonics Converter software. They offer sound engineers and VR enthusiasts more control over the recording process and greater post-processing capabilities.

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